Category Archives: Uncategorized

Improved ‘equalto’ validation for Parsley.js

I’ve been playing with Parsely.js for form validation on a client project. It’s pretty nice, but I was unhappy with the ‘equalto’ implementation. ‘equalto’ allows you to link two fields whose entries should always match, such as when you have password or email confirmation fields during account registration. parsley-equalto is not symmetrical. If you enter some text into A, and enter non-matching text into B, B will not validate. If you correct B so that it matches A, then B will validate. So far, so good. But if you correct A so that it matches B, it won’t change the validation.

So I wrote a custom implementation that triggers validation on the paired field, making the link between the fields symmetrical. It’s pretty ugly (to avoid recursion) and doesn’t have any error handling, but it should point you in the right direction. (I’ve called it iff, which you can look up.)

The markup:

<input
  name="password"
  id="password"
  data-parsley-trigger="blur"
  data-parsley-iff="#password-confirm"
  data-parsley-iff-message=""
/>

<input
  name="password-confirm"
  id="password-confirm"
  data-parsley-trigger="blur"
  data-parsley-iff="#password"
  data-parsley-iff-message="Passwords must match."
/>

The validator:

var iffRecursion = false;
window.Parsley.addValidator( 'iff', {
    validateString: function( value, requirement, instance ) {
        var $partner = $( requirement );
        var isValid = $partner.val() == value;
        if ( iffRecursion ) {
            iffRecursion = false;
        } else {
            iffRecursion = true;
            $partner.parsley().validate();
        }
	return isValid;
    }
} );

WordCamp Chicago 2016 slides

I just finished giving a talk at WordCamp Chicago titled “Backward Compatibility as a Design Principle”, in which I discussed WordPress’s approach to backward compatibility, how it’s evolved over the years, and its costs and benefits when compared to the alternatives. I’m not sure that the slides are very helpful in isolation, but someone asked me to post them, and I am not one to disappoint my Adoring Fans. Embedded below.

wc-chicago-2016

download as pdf

2015

Previously: 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009.

I wrote one year ago that 2015 would be a hard year. And so it was. Here’s the requisite Dec 31 braindump.

In January, I became a dad again. Seeing my two kids grow together and become friends has been one of the privileges of my life. But the logistics of having two kids is pretty different (and much more exhausting) than when you’ve got just one child. The process of finding balance is ongoing.

The other big event of the year is that, in July, our family moved from New York City to Chicago. Moving sucks. It’s expensive, it’s disorienting, it’s inconvenient. My possessions were in limbo with the moving company for something like 13 days. Practicalities aside, it’s hard to leave NYC. While I grew up in the Midwest, I spent my entire adult life in New York and feel like a New Yorker. There’s something about New York that features more prominently in its residents’ inner ideas about who they are than when you live in, say, Ohio. In the same way as when I left graduate school, I’ve had to face this miniature identity crisis by reevaluating those aspects of my former life that are actually (ie, not just conventionally) central to what makes me tick, and then find a way to fit them in the context of my new life. This project is also ongoing đŸ™‚

Partly in response to my man-without-a-country malaise, and partly out of philosophical motivations, I poured myself into free software contribution in 2015. More than 50% of my working year was spent doing unpaid work on WordPress, BuddyPress, and related projects. (More details.) I’m a vocal proponent for structuring your work life in such a way that it subsidizes passion projects, though numbers like these make me wonder whether there’s a limit to how far this principle can be pushed. I guess I’ll continue to test these boundaries in 2016.

One of the things I’d like to do in 2016, as regards work balance, is to find more ways to work with cool people. I am a proud lone wolf, but sometimes I feel like there’s a big disconnect between my highly social free software work and my fairly solitary consulting work.

Happy new year!